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NAME

perldebug - Perl debugging

DESCRIPTION

First of all, have you tried using the -w switch?

If you're new to the Perl debugger, you may prefer to read perldebtut, which is a tutorial introduction to the debugger .

The Perl Debugger

If you invoke Perl with the -d switch, your script runs under the Perl source debugger. This works like an interactive Perl environment, prompting for debugger commands that let you examine source code, set breakpoints, get stack backtraces, change the values of variables, etc. This is so convenient that you often fire up the debugger all by itself just to test out Perl constructs interactively to see what they do. For example:

 
    $ perl -d -e 42  

In Perl, the debugger is not a separate program the way it usually is in the typical compiled environment. Instead, the -d flag tells the compiler to insert source information into the parse trees it's about to hand off to the interpreter. That means your code must first compile correctly for the debugger to work on it. Then when the interpreter starts up, it preloads a special Perl library file containing the debugger.

The program will halt right before the first run-time executable statement (but see below regarding compile-time statements) and ask you to enter a debugger command. Contrary to popular expectations, whenever the debugger halts and shows you a line of code, it always displays the line it's about to execute, rather than the one it has just executed.

Any command not recognized by the debugger is directly executed (eval'd) as Perl code in the current package. (The debugger uses the DB package for keeping its own state information.)

For any text entered at the debugger prompt, leading and trailing whitespace is first stripped before further processing. If a debugger command coincides with some function in your own program, merely precede the function with something that doesn't look like a debugger command, such as a leading ; or perhaps a +, or by wrapping it with parentheses or braces.

 

Readline Support

As shipped, the only command-line history supplied is a simplistic one that checks for leading exclamation points. However, if you install the Term::ReadKey and Term::ReadLine modules from CPAN, you will have full editing capabilities much like GNU readline(3) provides. Look for these in the modules/by-module/Term directory on CPAN. These do not support normal vi command-line editing, however.

A rudimentary command-line completion is also available. Unfortunately, the names of lexical variables are not available for completion.

Editor Support for Debugging

If you have the FSF's version of emacs installed on your system, it can interact with the Perl debugger to provide an integrated software development environment reminiscent of its interactions with C debuggers.

Perl comes with a start file for making emacs act like a syntax-directed editor that understands (some of) Perl's syntax. Look in the emacs directory of the Perl source distribution.

A similar setup by Tom Christiansen for interacting with any vendor-shipped vi and the X11 window system is also available. This works similarly to the integrated multiwindow support that emacs provides, where the debugger drives the editor. At the time of this writing, however, that tool's eventual location in the Perl distribution was uncertain.

Users of vi should also look into vim and gvim, the mousey and windy version, for coloring of Perl keywords.

Note that only perl can truly parse Perl, so all such CASE tools fall somewhat short of the mark, especially if you don't program your Perl as a C programmer might.

The Perl Profiler

If you wish to supply an alternative debugger for Perl to run, just invoke your script with a colon and a package argument given to the -d flag. The most popular alternative debuggers for Perl is the Perl profiler. Devel::DProf is now included with the standard Perl distribution. To profile your Perl program in the file mycode.pl, just type:

 
    $ perl -d:DProf mycode.pl  

When the script terminates the profiler will dump the profile information to a file called tmon.out. A tool like dprofpp, also supplied with the standard Perl distribution, can be used to interpret the information in that profile.

Debugging regular expressions

use re 'debug' enables you to see the gory details of how the Perl regular expression engine works. In order to understand this typically voluminous output, one must not only have some idea about how regular expression matching works in general, but also know how Perl's regular expressions are internally compiled into an automaton. These matters are explored in some detail in perldebguts/"Debugging regular expressions".

Debugging memory usage

Perl contains internal support for reporting its own memory usage, but this is a fairly advanced concept that requires some understanding of how memory allocation works. See perldebguts/"Debugging Perl memory usage" for the details.

SEE ALSO

You did try the -w switch, didn't you?

perldebtut, perldebguts, re, DB, Devel::DProf, dprofpp, Dumpvalue, and perlrun.

BUGS

You cannot get stack frame information or in any fashion debug functions that were not compiled by Perl, such as those from C or C++ extensions.

If you alter your @_ arguments in a subroutine (such as with shift or pop), the stack backtrace will not show the original values.

The debugger does not currently work in conjunction with the -W command-line switch, because it itself is not free of warnings.

If you're in a slow syscall (like waiting, accepting, or reading from your keyboard or a socket) and haven't set up your own $SIG{INT} handler, then you won't be able to CTRL-C your way back to the debugger, because the debugger's own $SIG{INT} handler doesn't understand that it needs to raise an exception to longjmp(3) out of slow syscalls.

 

 

 

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